BAT FIRST AID/ RESCUE

 

  If a bat needs help, if it is found injured, grounded, trapped in a building, out in daylight or caught by a cat, then make sure you adhere by the following five steps. Please remember that some bats may not show any obvious signs of injury.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RELEASE A BAT WITHOUT AN EXPERT'S ADVICE.

You should avoid handling the bat, but if it is necessary WEAR GLOVES due to the small risk of a type of rabies.

 

STEP 1

Place bat in a small secure container with sufficient air holes.

 Bats can escape through a hole you can fit your little finger into, so cover any holes this size by taping them up, sticky side of the tape facing outwards so the bat won’t get stuck on it.

 

A shoe box is ideal. Other suitable containers include an empty plastic takeaway box with air holes, or even a sock.

Handling the bat directly is not necessary.

 

The bat can be contained like a spider, by placing a box on top of it and sliding a piece of card underneath.

 

Alternatively use a cloth or tea towel, cover the bat and gently transfer the whole thing into the box.

STEP 2
 

 Place a cloth, such as a tea towel, in the box to give the bat somewhere to hide.

 

Horseshoe bats are different and must be able to hang freely perhaps using the air holes or the end the box. You may also wedge a wooden stick /cocktail stick in. They are unable to crawl along the ground so make sure that there are towels right next to the water bowel so that they can climb down to drink.

 

STEP 3

A small, shallow container of water must be provided.

A plastic milk bottle lid is ideal. Water should be removed during transport.

STEP 4

 

Keep the bat indoors in a cool, quiet place away from direct sunlight, animals and small children.

 

Feeding is not necessary.

STEP 5

Ring the Bat helpline: The Bat Conservation Trust on 0345 130 0228

Bristol Area - Bristol Bat Rescue on 07903497213 OR 07902075004 OR text BAT with your name, postcode and house number.

Get in contact with an out of hours person look on the website www.bats.org.uk

 

BABY BATS:

During the summer months, it is also possible to sometimes find a baby bat that has either been orphaned has been unable to return to its roost. Baby bats are small and initially furless. 

NEVER RELEASE A BABY BAT WITHOUT EXPERT GUIDANCE

If you find a baby bat it is urgent that advice and expert care is sought.

PLEASE BE AWARE

If you cannot get help within 24 hours or if it requires urgent medical attention then take the bat to a local vet.

Inform the vet they can obtain further information from The Bat Conservation Trust.

ABOUT US >

A charity dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of British bat species

Registered Charity No: 1182760

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